Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors – What to Know Before You Go

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors is currently on display at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta through February 17.  Don’t know who this is?  Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama was born in 1929 and is considered to be one of the twentieth century’s most influential artists.   Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors has sold out in every city that it has stopped in.   Some people even say it’s the “Hamilton of the art world!”

But why should you go or care?  If there is one thing I have come to realize, life is about so much more than the stuff we buy.  Life is meant to be experienced, and when you visit something like a museum, you are enriching your life and the lives of others.  Think about it.  What memories do you hold dear to your heart today?  Chances are they do not involve stuff but rather it is the time you spent with someone.   Experiences make us happier than having more possessions.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

What do I need to know?

When you arrive you will stand in a holding area in the lobby and wait your turn to be taken to the 2nd floor.  The line does move relatively fast.  We recommend getting there about 30 minutes before your scheduled time.

Your ticket also gives you access to the High Museum so we recommend making a day of it and staying to see all the pieces they have.

Regular admission tickets to the High Museum DO NOT give you access to this installation.

At the request of the artist, you are only given 20 to 30 seconds in each room.

Anywhere from 2 to 3 guests enter a room at a time.  While this only happened to us once, be prepared for the possibility of being split up from your partner.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

“Bring on Picasso, bring on Matisse, bring on anybody! I would stand up to them all with a single polka dot!” Yayoi Kusma

How long should I plan to stay at the exhibit?

About two hours will allow you enough time to see everything that is there.  While it may be disheartening to know that only a set amount of tickets were sold to this installation, the good news is that it helps keep the crowd to a minimum.  This allows you to immerse yourself in the exhibit.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

Are there lines?

Yes!  However, they do move rather quickly.  Some of the more popular rooms such as the Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away have lines that are a little longer, but they are still doable.  I think the maximum time we waited was 20 minutes.

Can you go back through an exhibit?  Yes, the only catch is you will have to stand in line again.

Be sure to read the timeline dots and notes as you are standing in line.  You’ll learn quite a bit about this Japanese artist.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

What is there to see?

The exhibit showcases Yayoi Kusama’s artistic journey across six decades featuring six of the artist’s iconic kaleidoscopic Infinity Mirror Rooms.  These rooms are mirrored boxes filled with suspended lights and surreal objects that extend into infinity.

Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away

A mirror-lined room with flashing LED lights hanging from the ceiling,

All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins

Featuring dozens of Kusama’s signature dotted, bright-yellow pumpkin sculptures.

The Obliteration Room

Patrons are given a sheet of stickers dots to literally help obliterate an all-white living space into an explosion of polka dot color.

Dots Obsession—Love Transformed into Dots

A mirrored room filled with pink and black inflatables suspended from the ceiling.

Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity

A mirror-lined room filled with gleaming golden lights that reproduce and reflect endlessly upon each other.

Infinity Mirrored Room Love Forever

Not a room that you step into, but a room with two square windows that allow patrons to poke their heads into so that you can be totally immersed into a dazzling geometric light show that takes place inside.

Infinity Mirror Room—Phalli’s Field

Red-spotted white tubers in a room lined with mirrors.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

Can I take pictures?

Ideally, it would be best to experience it, but I know the temptation is far too great to snap those pictures.  I was guilty of this myself.  I recommend putting your phone on video mode as soon as you enter the rooms and quickly take a video and then immerse yourself in the exhibit.  You are given roughly 20 to 30 seconds in each room so you have to make the best of that time.  Don’t be foolish and waste your time worrying over capturing that perfect selfie because you may find that you run out of time!

The only room where photos are not allowed is the “All the Eternal Love I have for the Pumpkins” room.  There is even a guide that enters the room with you!

If you do take pictures, share them on social media using hashtag #InfiniteKusama and #HighMuseum.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

Is it kid-friendly?

For the most part, yes.  There are some images of nudity depicted and some of the content that you read is sexual in nature.

Can I still get tickets?

While tickets to this coveted installation may be sold out online, tickets are available to those willing to stand in line daily.  Only 100 are sold each day though so be sure to get there EARLY if you want to snag some.  They go on sale at 9am each day.

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors High Museum

Are there other pieces that I should see?

Be sure to head over to the Atlanta Botanical Gardens to see Narcissus Garden.  Made of 1,400 stainless steel spheres, this exhibit can be viewed from the Canopy Walk and along many of the trails leading into and out of Storza Woods.  It will remain on view through Spring.

 

Let us know if you get the chance to go.  We would love to know your thoughts.  And if you are looking for a a gift idea, why not give the gift of a High Museum of Art membership?

 

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